H. SITES OF NATURE CONSERVATION INTEREST (SNCI’s)

Kent Trust for Nature Conservation

Sites of Nature Conservation Interest

Site:
Monkton Chalk Pit
LPA:
Thanet
Parish:
Monkton
Owner:
Thanet Countryside Trust
KTNC Grade:
II
Category:
Disued pit - grassland, scrub and cliffs
Area:
5.9 ha/14 acres
Site reference No:
TH 1
Map reference:
TR 284656
AONB:
No
SLA:
No
AHNCV:
No
TPO:
No
ASSA:
No
Grade I/II Agricultural Land: No
Scheduled species:
Public rights of way:
No

DESCRIPTION

Large, deep chalk pit, disused for many years, now managed as a nature reserve by the Thanet Countryside Trust and very important for wildlife in terms of the Thanet area.

It contains a variety of habitats including short-turfed grassland dominated by fescues and with a wide variety of chalk herbs. Kidney vetch (Anthyllis vulneria) is present together with several common orchids. A notable feature is the abundance of the uncommon lesser centaury (Centaurium pulchellum), probably the largest population in Kent.

Rough grassland with a variety of coarser plants such as greater knapweed (Centaurea scabiosa), wild carrot (Daucus carota) and others associated with disturbance is widespread. Other habitats include mixed hawthorn/blackthorn/elder scrub which is developing especially on the north-facing side of the quarry; a damper area, with colonising sallows, which still contains a opulation of southern marsh orchid (Dactylorhiza praetermissa); and very dry chalk cliffs, beginning to be colonised by algae and bryophytes.

A good range of common lepidoptera occur in fairly large numbers and are well recorded. Invertebrates and bird fauna are regularly recorded.

Thirty-three bryophytes were recorded on the day of visit and the pit is likely to be the only area in Thanet for many of the species. The site is generally well recorded and is used for educational purposes.

(Note: KTNC holds more detailed information)

Other sites nearby:
Monkton Marshes SNCI
Minster station environs SNCI

KENT WILDLIFE TRUST

Sites of Nature Conservation Interest

Site:
St Peter's Churchyard, Broadstairs
LPA:
Thanet
Parish:
Broadstairs and St Peter's
Owner:
Church Commissioners
Category:
Grassland, scrub, woodland
Area:
3.68 ha/9.09 acres
Date first notified:1985
Date amended:
November 1997
Site reference No:
TH 7
Map reference:
TR 381684
AONB:
No
SLA:
No
TPO:
Yes
Protected species:
No
Public rights of way:
Yes

DESCRIPTION

The boundary of this very large churchyard is lined with mature sycamore, beech, ash and line trees. The grassland is kept very tightly mown in the small area immediately around the church building, but the rest of the area is generally unmanaged and has developed into a wilderness of secondary woodland with patches of open, rank grassland and scrub.

The secondary woodland is dominated by sycamore saplings and coppiced sycamore and ash, now grown tall. Areas of scrub are present, containing hawthorn, dog rose, dogwood and much bramble. Work was undertaken some years ago to control the secondary woodland, but this has grown up again and large, impenetrable thickets are overwhelming the gravestones and tombs.

There are still some small areas of rough grassland, often in the vicinity of the network of hard paths that run through the site. False oat-grass (Arrhenatherum elatius) and cock’s foot (Dactylis glomerata) dominate these patches, but there are occasional stands for tor-grass (Brachypodium pinnatum) and a good range of common herbs occurs, including hardhead (Centaurea nigra), oxeye daisy (Leucanthemum vulgare), hedge bedstraw (Galium album), lady’s bedstraw (G.verum), bird’s-foot-trefoil (Lotus corniculatus) and field scabious (Knautia arvensis). The grassland is notable for the large numbers of naturalised spring bulbs.

Some clearance work is currently being carried out at the western end of the yard.

Approximately 26 common lichen species are present on the tombs and church walls, and 17 bryophytes were recorded on tombs and trees, including Zygodon viridissimus and Tortula intermedia on the tombstones.

Breeding birds present include common warblers such as willow warbler, chiffchaff and whitethroat. Blue tit, great tit, blackbird (Birds of Conservation Concern. RSPB. Amber List.1966) and hedge sparrow were present on a recent visit.

The site also supports a range of common butterflies, including meadow brown, green-veined white, gatekeeper and large white.

The churchyard is likely to provide an important wildlife refuge in inland Thanet, as the surrounding area is either under intensive cultivation with no trees or scrub or is built-up.

KENT WILDLIFE TRUST

Sites of Nature Conservation Interest

Site:
Golf Course Roughs, Kingsgate
LPA:
Thanet
Parish:
Broadstairs and St Peter's
Owner:
Private
Category:
Grassland, scrub
Area:
46.56 ha/115.05 acres
Date first notified:1985
Date amended:
1992, February 1999
Site reference No:
TH 9
Map reference:
TR 3394702
TR389698
AONB:
No
SLA:
No
TPO:
Yes
Protected species:
Yes
Public rights of way:
No

DESCRIPTION

The roughs of North Foreland Golf Course comprise an area of considerable interest. They include unimproved and semi-improved chalk grassland, and the importance of the site is enhanced by its proximity to the coastal areas at North Foreland and Foreness, which form part of the Thanet Coast SSSI.

The roughs are generally dominated by erect brome (Bromopsis erecta), with occasional patches of tor grass (Brachypodium pinnatum). Where the soils are deeper and more neutral in character, false oat-grass (Arrhenatherum elatius) and cock’s foot (Dactylis glomerata) are more common. There are small areas where finer grasses are present, including both red fescue (Festuca rubra) and sheep’s fescue (F.ovina), yellow oat-grass (Trisetum flavescens) and, rarely, quaking-grass (Briza media).

A variety of chalk-loving herbs includes kidney vetch (Anthyllis vulneraria), small scabious (Scabiosa columbaria), wild thyme (Thymus praecox), lesser cat-mint (County Scarce Plants. Atlas of Kent Flora. Philp. 1982) (Clinopodium calamintha), wild carrot (Daucus carota), salad burnet (Sanguisorba minor), sainfoin (Onobrychis sativa) and wild clary (Salvia verbenaca). Other grassland herbs include lady’s bedstraw (Galium verum), hardhead (Centaurea nigra) and bird’s-foot-trefoil (Lotus corniculatus). Where the grass is ranker, greater knapweed (Centaurea scabiosa) and hedge bedstraw (Galium mollugo) are common, with developing young scrub of hawthorn and blackthorn also intruding into the grassland. Both pyramidal orchid (Anacamptis pyramidalis )and common spotted-orchid (Dactylorhiza fuchsii) are regularly recorded.

Some of the wooded fringes to the site are included for their contribution to the faunal interest. They tend to be dominated by sycamore and exotic oaks, but they also have a varied scrub and ground flora, including stinking iris (Iiris foetidissima), ivy (Hedera helix) and mounds of bramble, together with hawthorn and wild privet. Occasional thickets of suckering young elm and blackthorn are features of the surrounds.

Thirty-eight species of birds have been recorded, including skylark, linnet, stonechat, song thrush (Birds of Conservation Concern. Red List. RSPB. 1996), redwing (Birds of Conservation Concern. Amber List. RSPB. 1996 and Protected under Wildlife & Countryside Act 1981), fieldfare (Red Data Birds in Britain. NCC and RSPB. 1990 and Birds of Conservation Concern. Amber List. RSPB. 1996 and Protected under Wildlife & Countryside Act 1981), curlew (Birds of Conservation Concern. Amber List. RSPB. 1996) and common warblers. The area is likely to serve as a landfall for migrant birds in spring and autumn.

A variety of lepidoptera have recently been recorded, including marbled white, small health, large skipper, Essex skipper and small skipper, meadow brown, common blue and gatekeeper.

A small area of rough, unmanaged, semi-improved neutral grassland to the south-west is also included. This area is dominated by a range of grasses, including false oat-grass, cock’s foot, common bent (Agrostis capillaris) and fescues. Herbs include bird’s-foot-trefoil, meadow vetchling (Lathyrus pratensis), smooth hawk’s beard (Crepis capillaris) and yarrow (Achillea millefolium). The grassland has become very scrubby, with increasing hawthorn and rose and would improve with some management. However, the area is likely to be very undisturbed and therefore useful to breeding birds and mammals.

KENT WILDLIFE TRUST

Site:
Woods and Grassland, Minster Marshes 301646, 304643, 325625
LPA:
Thanet
Parish:
Minster
Owner:
British Rail/Private
Category:
Grassland, scrub, ponds, woodland
Area:
24.16 ha/59/67 acres
Date first notified:1986
Date amended:
June 1995
Site reference No:
TH 12
Map reference:
TR 316636
AONB:
No
SLA:
No
TPO:
Yes
Scheduled Species:
Public rights of way:
Yes

DESCRIPTION

This small mosaic of habitats close to Minster railway station includes:

  1. Areas of rough grassland with ant hills and a wide range of common herbs and grasses, including tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) and cocksfoot (Dactylis glomerata) with lady’s bedstraw (Galium verum), stone parsley (Sison amomum) and hardhead (Centaurea nigra). Finer turf with red fescue (Festuca rubra) also occurs in parts, and large areas of reeds are present in the very damp areas.
  2. Scrubby areas close to the railway line with heavily silted ponds now becoming scrubbed up with sallows. Common marsh plants occur here, including fool’s water-cress (Apium nodosum), flote grass (Glyceria spp.) and yellow iris (Iris pseudacorus), in addition to pendulous sedge (Carex pendula) and false fox sedge (C.otrubae). A feature of this area is the growth of corticolous lichens and bryophytes on sallow and elder near the water. These are generally not common in Thanet.
  3. A small copse with mixed broadleaved trees comprising ash, alder, hawthorn and willow occurs at the western end of the site. The ground flora includes bramble, cow parsley (Anthriscus sylvestris) and male fern (Dryopteris felix-mas). Wood sedge (Carex sylvatica) and several stands of stinking iris (Iris foetidissima) are also present.
  4. A large, heavily silted pond occurs on the western margin of the copse, with large alder coppice stools and much sallow. The vegetation consists mainly of lesser pond sedge (Carex acutiformis).

KENT WILDLIFE TRUST

Sites of Nature Conservation Interest

Site:
Ash Level and South Richborough Pasture
LPA:
Dover
Parish:
Preston/Ash/Sandwich
Owner:
Private
Category:
Grassland, dykes, scrub
Area:
1009 ha/2495 acres
Date first notified:1985
Date amended:
1994 (map) November 1997
Site reference No:
DO 21
Map reference:
TR 300618
AONB:
No
SLA:
No
TPO:
No
Protected Species:
Yes
Public rights of way:
Yes

DESCRIPTION

The site comprises an extensive area of low-lying agricultural land with interconnecting dyke systems, mostly situated to the south of the River Stour. The area is crossed by old drove roads edged with well-established hedgerows of hawthorn and blackthorn and containing the occasional oak. Old counter walls with their unimproved grassland also form an important feature. Many of the fields have been drained or converted to arable or improved pasture in recent years, but some semi-improved or rough pasture remains, particularly in the area south of Richborough Farm and that south of Richborough Power Station.

The dykes and their banks still retain wildlife interest. The water varies from brackish near the River Stour to fresh further inland. The Richborough stream is a wider and deeper waterway, with the occasional tall willow and scrub standing above the banks. Aquatic and marginal vegetation includes sea club-rush (Bolboschoenus maritimus), frobgit (Hydrocharis morsusranae), tubular water-dropwort (Oenanthe fistulosa), brookweed (Samolus valerandi) and flowering-rush (Butomus umbellatus) among the more interesting specifies. Several species of pondweed (Potomageton spp). spiked water-milfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum) and watercrowfoot (Ranunculus spp) also occur, and bladderwort (Ultricularia australis) is one of the more unusual species to be found. Commoner species such as branched bur-reed (Sparganium erectum), common reed (Phragmites australis) and water-plantain (Alisma plantago-aqyatuca) are found throughout. Corn parsley (Petroselinum segetum), knotted hedge-parsley (Torilis nodosa), creeping-jenny (ysimachia nummularia) and stone parsley (sison amomum) are found in the bankside vegetation. Divided sedge (Carex divisa) is also scattered throughout, mainly in pasture areas.

Winter-wet semi-improved grassland south-west of Richborough Farm centred on TR 313596 supports marsh foxtail (Alopecurus geniculatus), divided sedge (Scarce Plants in Britain. JNCC. 1994) cuckoo flower (Cardamine pratensis) and large quantities of rush species, including hard ush (Juncus inflexus). Bulbous foxtail (Scarce Plants in Britain. JNCC. 1994) (County Rare Plants. Atlas of Kent Flora. Philp. 1982) Alopecurus bulbosus was recorded in the 1988 Rate Plant Survey, but its presence here now requires confirmation. A large overgrown pond with dense sallow scrub and several old mature ash and oak trees are also present in this ground. An area of semi-improved and improved pasture with species-rich dykes at TR 318594 is fringed to the north by an old embankment with hawthorn scrub. Grassy patches on top of the embankment support species typical of dry soils such as small clovers, including knotted clover (Trifolium striatum) and subterranean clover (County Scarce Plants. Atlas of Kent Flora. Philp. 1982) (T.subterraneum).

At TR 329620, the cattle-grazed pasture south of the power station between the railway and the River Stour is also semi-improved and contains corn parsley, knotted hedge-parsley, bulbous buttercup (Ranunculus bulbosus) and divided sedge ((Scarce Plants in Britain. JNCC. 1994) in the turf. Bird’s-foot-trefoil (Lotus corniculatus) and meadow vetchling (Lathyrus pratensis) also occur occasionally. According to the present grazier, the land has not received artificial fertiliser for at least nine years. The ditches in this area include some with much open water and others dominated by common reed. The railway bank and reed bed forming the western margin of this area are included in the site. Wigeon (Red Data Book. NCC and RSPB. 1993) (Birds of Conservation Concern. Red List. RSPB. 1996), teal (Red Data Book. NCC and RSPB. 1993) (Birds of Conservation Concern. Red List. RSPB. 1996), pochard (Red Data Book. NCC and RSPB. 1993) (Birds of Conservation Concern. Red List. RSPB. 1996), bearded tit (Red Data Book. NCC and RSPB. 1993) (Protected under Wildlife & Countryside Act 1981) (Birds of Conservation Concern. Red List. RSPB. 1996), and tufted duck, a species of nature co nservation concern in Kent, all frequent the lagoons in the north-western corner of this area.

The River Stour and both banks between TR 325601 and TR 333610, and the west bank only between TR 333617 and TR 333601, have been added to the site, and include an area of undeveloped scrub and reed bed. The area around TR 333601 is a transitional area of brackish inundated vegetation with some damp semi-improved neutral grassland and scattered scrub. Between the railway line and the river at TR 322594 an area of rough marshy grassland has much common reed, some open water and scattered scrub. Dittander (Scarce Plants in Britain. JNCC. 1994) (County Scarce Plants. Atlas of Kent Flora. Philp. 1982) (Lepidium latifolium) is frequent by the river in the western half of the area. Kingsfisher (Protected under Wildlife& Countryside Act RSPB 1996) (Birds of Conservation Concern. Amber List. RSPB. 1996) grey wagtail and common sandpiper are found on and near the river, and bearded tit (Red Data Book. NCC and RSPB. 1993) (Protected under Wildlife& countryside Act RSPB 1996) (Birds of Conservation Concern. Amber List. RSPB. 1996) has been recorded nearby. Great crested grebe has been a winter/spring visitor.

Near Lower Goldstone, at TR 295613, a small area of ditch with a well-developed reed bed, adjacent grassy banks and blackthorn and hawthorn scrub is also important. Great willowherb (Epilobium hirsutum) and hemp agrimony (Eupatorium cannabinum) are abundant. Tree sparrow (Birds of Conservation Concern. Red List. RSPB. 1996) (Biodiversity UK Steering Group Report. Mid List. 1995) is regularly present here, and large numbers of fieldfare (Red Data Book. NCC and RSPB. 1993) (Protected under Wildlife & Countryside Act 1981) use this area in winter.

A fishing pond at TR 297604 has good marginal vegetation and a large central reed bed. Dragonflies found here include migrant hawker, brown hawker, common darter, ruddy darter and black-tailed skimmer.

Two fishing ponds with marginal vegetation at TR 322592, separated by a spit of rough grassland and scrub, are old gravel pits. There is a large reed bed and marshy grassland at the southern end. Common lizard is present. Dragonfly species include migrant hawker, brown hawker, common darter and ruddy darter. The common blue damselfly and blue-tailed damselfly also occur.

Elsewhere, the site includes only ditches and streams with their banks and a 3m margin along the top of the bank, drove roads wit their thick hedges, and counter walls. The whole area is notable for birds, particularly wintering raptors such as hen harrier (Red Data Book. NCC and RSPB 1993) (Protected under Wildlife& Countryside Act 1981) (Birds of Conservation Concern. Red List. RSPB. 1996) and merlin (Red Data Book. NCC and RSPB 1993) (Protected under Wildlife& Countryside Act 1981) (Birds of Conservation Concern. Red List. RSPB. 1996). Up to 2000 wigeon (Red Data Book. NCC & PSPB. 1993) (Birds of Conservation Concern. Amber List. RSPB. 1996), 1000 lapwing (Birds of Conservation Concern. Amber List. RSPB. 1996) and large numbers of teal (Red Data Book. NCC & PSPB. 1993) (Birds of Conservation Concern. Amber List. RSPB. 1996), also frequent the area in winter. Breeding birds include little grebe, little owl, yellow wagtail, tree sparrow (Birds of Conservation Concern. Red List. RSPB. 1996) (Biodiversity UK Steering Group Report. Mid List. 1995), reed warbler, sedge warbler and reed bunting, (Birds of Conservation Concern. Red List. RSPB. 1996) (Biodiversity UK Steering Group Report. Mid List. 1995). Hairlike pondweed (Scarce Plants in Britain. JNCC. 1994) (County Scarce Plants. Atlas of Kent Flora. Philp. 1982). Potamogeton trichoides is found in the larger channels such as the Richborough Stream, and rootless duckweed (Scarce Plants in Britain. JNCC. 1994) (County Scarce Plants. Atlas of Kent Flora. Philp. 1982). Wolffia arrhiza is scattered widely and is often abundant in dykes.

Mammals recorded include rabbit, fox and hare (Biodiversity UK Steering Group Report. Short List. 1995), the latter being a declining species in the county. Banks along the Goshall Stream and a number of the dykes contain the burrows of water vole (Protected under Wildlife & Countryside Act 1981) (Biodiversity UK Steering Group Report. Short List. 1995), a nationally declining species.

22 species of common butterfly have been recorded. The drove roads with their rough, grassy margins and hedges support a number of species, including meadow brown, common blue, speckled wood, green-veined white, comma, small tortoiseshell, red admiral and gatekeeper. An important assemblage of 12 species of dragonflies has also been recorded. In addition to those mentioned above, these include yellow-winged darter and banded demoiselle. More species may be present at different times of year. The site also supports the two rare freshwater snail species Segmentia nitida (Biodiversity UK Steering Group Report. Short List. 1995) and (Psidium pseudosphaerium) in ditches in the vicinity of TR 295628 and TR 279615.

KENT WILDLIFE TRUST

Site:
St Nicholas at Wade Churchyard
LPA:
Thanet
Parish:
St Nicholas at Wade
Owner:
Church Commissioners
Category:
Grassland, walls, tombs
Area:
0.36 ha/0.89 acres
Date first notified:November 1997
Site reference No:
TH 13
Map reference:
TR 266667
AONB:
No
SLA:
No
TPO:
Conservation Area
Protected Species:
No
Public rights of way:
No

DESCRIPTION

Chest tombs and headstones within the churchyard are set amid grassland. The grassland is generally well managed but herb-rich, with an area of ranker grassland containing nettle (Urtica dioica) and elder scrub present in the southern corner. A good range of herbs includes oxeye daisy (Leucanthemum vulgare), burnet saxifrage (Pimpinella saxifraga), common sorrel (Rumex acetosa), bird’s-food-trefoil (Lotus corniculatus) and abundant fiddle dock (Rumex pulcher). The latter, a species characteristic of dry East Kent grassland, was once common but is now in decline. Lady’s bedstraw (Galium verum) is also widespread in the turf. A colony of strawberry clover (Trifolium Fragiferum), a species associated with grassland close to the sea, is also found here. The fine grass species include red fescue (Festuca rubra), yellow oat-grass (Trisetum flavescen)s, and meadow barley (Hordeum secalinum).

The walls of the church and churchyard, together with both acid and calcareous vertical stones and chest tombs, support over 60 species of lichens. A number of colonies of the fruticose lichen (Ramalina subfarinaecea), together with Opegrapha chevallieri and Haematomma ochrolechia var. porphyrium, are present on the old plastered north wall of the church, while Caloplaca ruderum, a typical eastern species, occurs on the mortar of the south-facing wall. Lichens are very scarce in this part of Kent, due to the agricultural pollution and lack of suitable habitat.

KENT WILDLIFE TRUST

Sites of Nature Conservation Interest

Site:
St Mary Magdalene Churchyard, Monkton
LPA:
Thanet
Parish:
Monkton
Owner:
Church Commissioners
Category:
Grassland, walls, tombs
Area:
0.75 ha/1.85 acres
Date first notified:November 1997
Site reference No:
TH 14
Map reference:
TR 278653
AONB:
No
SLA:
No
TPO:
Conservation Area
Protected Species:
No
Public rights of way:
No

DESCRIPTION

This churchyard contains semi-improved grassland which is managed in the main area in front of the church entrance but is rather rank and unmanaged in the rest of the yard.

Where the grassland is managed, it supports a number of common meadow plants such as hardhead (Centaurea nigra), oxeye daisy (Leucanthemum vulgare), burnet saxifrage (Pimpinella saxifraga), lady’s bedstraw (Galium verum), hedge bedstraw G.album and bird’sfoot- trefoil (Lotus corniculatus). Fiddle dock (Rumex pulcher), a characteristic but declining species of East Kent grassland, is also common.

The remainder of the site is grass-dominated and rank, with false oat-grass (Arrhenatherum elatius) and cock’s-foot (Dactylis glomerata) dominant and herbs generally rather suppressed. Increased frequency of mowing and removal of cuttings or occasional grazing would produce a ore interesting flora in these areas. A narrow grass slope outside the church is very similar to adjacent grassland inside the gate, containing hardhead, burnet saxifrage and bird’s-foottrefoil in the turf.

The church walls and tombs support a fairly good number of lichen species, which are likely to be important in relation to the rest of the district, which is given over almost entirely to intensive farming and has few suitable habitats inland for lichens.

Butterflies recorded include common blue, meadow brown, gatekeeper, peacock, small tortoiseshell, small white and green-veined white.

KENT WILDLIFE TRUST

Site:
Ramsgate Cemetery
LPA:
Thanet
Parish:
 
Owner:
Thanet District Council
Category:
Grassland, tombs, walls, paths, Parkland trees
Area:
13.5 ha/33.4 acres
Date first notified:June 1998
Site reference No:
TH 15
Map reference:
TR 384661
AONB:
No
SLA:
No
TPO:
No
Protected Species:
No
Public rights of way:
Yes

DESCRIPTION

This very large cemetery, together with its equally large adjacent extension, contains a large expanse of well-managed short grassland which varies from being calcareous at the southern end to neutral towards the north. It probably represents one of the largest areas of semiimproved grassland outside SSSIs in Thanet district.

The grassland supports a variety of herb species, including oxeye daisy (Leucanthemum vulgare), salad burnet (Sanguisorba minor), mouse-ear hawkweed (Pilosella offcinarum), cowslip (Primula veris) and primrose (Primula vulgaris). Grasses include erect brome (Bromopsis erecta), sheep’s fescue (Festuca ovina) and red fescue (F.rubra), together with cock’s-foot (Dactylis glomerata) and false oat-grass (Arrhenatherum elatius). Rye grass (Lolium perenne) is more dominant in the northern half of the site. Alexanders (Smyrnium olusatrum), false brome (Brachypodium sylvaticum), wild arum (Arum maculatum) and sweet violet (Viola odorata) are common in the shadier parts of the shrubberies. A colony of autumn lady’s tresses (Spiranthes spiralis) (County Scarce Plants. Atlas of Kent Flora. Philp. 1982) is to be found near the path to the north of the main chapel, and this species may be present elsewhere. Large mature trees including beech, yew, Scots pine and sycamore are present around the circumference of the site and also line the many metalled paths.

The variety of tombs includes many made from granite and marble. At least 60 species of saxicolous lichens have been recorded on the tombs and on the cemetery walls, including an abundance of Polysporina simplex on granite and large colonies of Protoblastenia rupestris on limestone and marble. Caloplaca crenularia was found on a low acid stone within the extension, and Lecidea fusco atra was abundant on the well-lit parts of an east-facing brick wall. Of particular interest were a few colonies of Stereocaulon vesuvianum var. symphycheileoides on the iron railings around a large tomb and also in cracks on the top of an upright slate tomb. This species is scarce in Kent, although the variety is found in south-east England in urban areas in association with acid tops of walls and rusting iron.

Over 50 species of bryophytes have been recorded both in the grassland and on the tombs, paths and walls, particularly where mature trees give both shade and shelter.

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